Attached 

Does the Lack of a Secure Parental Attachment lead to Personality Disorders in Adulthood?
 Studies show that an insecure attachment regarding the parent/child relationship leads to unfulfilled emotional needs as a child and adult. Not experiencing enough love and praise, being consistently criticized, or being made to feel unimportant becomes the norm for the child. Given the negative impact of insecure parent/child attachments throughout the lifespan, interventions focusing on the emotional needs of the individual might need to be considered in order to aid in the therapeutic process. Additionally, research concludes that personality disorders can be traced back to early childhood experiences. In the article, Early Trauma and Subsequent Antisocial Behavior in Adults, Armstrong (2008) explains that, “ it is important understand that childhood trauma and maltreatment may be the root cause of their adult antisocial behaviors.” 

It seems as though research supports the idea of negative effects of an insecure attachment.

However, when exploring a positive temperament of a young child who is experiencing the same scenario, they seem to manage and adapt to whatever life throws at them. Based on this, it is reasonable to say that negative caregiver behavior in childhood does not necessarily lead to personality disorders in adulthood. – Tonya Tullis 

The Big Picture 

Ralph Waldo Emerson writes, “Bad times have a scientific value. These are occasions a good learner would not miss.” 

Though, I am not welcoming adversity with open arms, I have learned that each situation has strengthened my character, while gaining a fresh perspective and eventually attain new found wisdom. In the midst of life’s hardships, the possibility of a new understanding dwells within. However, during these circumstances, it is tough to see through complexities and perceive the event as an opportunity. By taking a positive stance, we allow ourselves the freedom of knowing that we are not going to remain stuck and eventually we will see the big picture.
         

 

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